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Info on Textured Implants and Polyurethane Coated
09-28-2007, 04:46 AM
Post: #1
  Location: NoImplants, Pennsylvania
  Type of Implants: Saline Filled (Smooth)
  Year/Years implanted: 1996
  Have you been Explanted?: Yes
  Implant Placement: Submuscular ('under muscle')
  Are you ill from Implants?: Yes
  What symptoms are you experiencing?: Fibromyalgia Chronic Fatigue Joint Aches Brain Fog Achy joints and muscles Memory problems Depression Vertigo Gastrointestinal problems All over body weakness
  Who removed your implants?: Dr. in Pennsylvania
  Did you Improve after Explant?: Feeling much better but still have a few lingering symptoms
 
http://www.info-implants.com/BC/06.html

April "Newsletter at B.C. Woman's Hospital Breast Implant Centre"

Date: Sun, 8 Apr 2001 22:32:32 -0700

From: "Adella and Richard Matthew"
adellaem@shaw.ca

To:
delphine1939@videotron.ca

I.A.S. IMPLANT AWARENESS SOCIETY

102 - 6086 Boundary Drive West

Surrey, B.C., Canada V3X 2B3

Telephone: (604) 572-8486

Website:
http://www.info-implants.com/BC/index.html

e-mail:
adellaem@shaw.ca

Dear Silicone Sisters,


The following message came to us over the Internet. I have many questions about what other people have heard or experienced about textured implants. Is the fungus caused from the saline or silicone or does the textured surface itself cause fungus or some sort of inflammation that just lingers on even after explant? How long does the itching and burning usually last? Any information would be appreciated.

Comments have been added after Dr. Pierre Blais' answer to these and other questions.

TEXTURED SURFACES AND THEIR PROBLEMS


Textured surfaces figure prominently amongst the history of breast augmentation devices. Their popularity is credited to W.J. Pangman who, in the 1960s, suggested that a rough surface would have a greater ability to attach itself on a slippery tissue surface. He reasoned that tissue would grow into the irregularities causing the implant to lock in place and become an integral part of its surroundings, a situation that he perceived as desirable with a device used for increasing breast size. This concept, termed _tissue fixation had been borrowed from vascular, cardiac, and abdominal wall repair surgery where implants made of porous fabric had been successfully employed for many years. For example, woven fabric tubes were widely used to replace large arteries. The fabric would become, with time, coated with new tissue that rendered the structures impermeable and permanently integrated into natural vasculature through fibrosis. The open fabrics induced the rapid formation of thick, smooth connective tissue termed pannus. Rough metal surfaces were also used in orthopaedic implants to induce bone ingrowth, causing parts that required strength and stability, such as hip and knee implant components to lock into adjacent bone.

The belief that immobilization of a breast implant against the chest wall or surrounding tissue became entrenched in plastic surgery and pervaded breast implant designs in the sixties and seventies. Porous tissue fixation parts or textured coatings were incorporated in nearly all early breast implants, such as the Cronin, the Pangman-Wallace, the New Polyplastic, the Ashley Natural-Y, and many others. By the seventies, serious problems associated with tissue fixation were well known. It took another decade to abandon the concept. Only polyurethane foam-covered breast prostheses remained as anachronistic examples of tissue fixation devices. They were the Ashley Natural-Y implants and their successors, such as the Vogue, Optimam, Meme, and Replicon.

These foam-coated devices were all initially predicated on the principle of tissue fixation. This would have been a reasonable assumption had the textured surface remained unaltered during the lifetime of the device. However, as reported by many surgeons and pathologists, this was not the case. The foam coating disintegrated and disappeared thus invalidating claims that fixation served any beneficial purpose. The promoters of foam implants later asserted that polyurethane foam-covered devices had resorbable and bioactive coatings that reduced their propensity to suffer capsular contracture. This claim was ill founded. The only definitive finding is that these devices soon lost their coatings that disintegrated and scattered into the surrounding breast tissue, frequently inducing severe adverse effects, including contracture.

The concept of rough-surfaced implants was reintroduced in the mid-80s by other manufacturers who sought to duplicate the texture of polyurethane without the risks of dissolution and disintegration. Textured products were investigated by American Heyer Schulte (AHS) in the mid-70s and led to other types of polyurethane foam-covered devices and implants textured through the temporary imprinting of textures through contact with foam surfaces. These were later abandoned because of fabrication problems and the uncharacterized toxicology of the adhesive and elastomers necessary for implementing the texturing.

Early commercial examples of textured-surface implants using direct texturing processes investigated by AHS were followed by other products made by the successor corporation. They include the Mentor Corporation SiltexTM breast implant lines introduced circa 1985. The SiltexTM shells made use of rough texturing molds to generate fine replicated irregularities on the surface of otherwise conventional prostheses. McGhan/Inamed introduced competing BiocellTM lines, a class of device made by casting a finished film of silicone elastomer on top of a conventional shell and then contaminating this layer with water-soluble particles. The soluble particles would then be redissolved in water to produce an irregular, vacuolated surface.

The BiocellTM texturing process was accident-prone. The requirements for a soluble sacrificial substance to create holes into a cast surface had a tendency to leave closed cell surfaces. Upon aggressive washing, the sacrificial material would eventually dissolve but the residual cavities would be nearly impossible to clean. The process produces frangible surfaces that readily spallated debris into the adjacent tissue. The closed cells and the poor permeability of the surfaces would facilitate growth of bacteria and aberrant denaturation of tissue within enclosed spaces. When infection occurred at the prosthesis-tissue interface, the problem was uncontrollable and self-propagating. The rough surface had a tendency to form a separate layer of pannus that formed on the texture and yet remained discrete from the outer capsule. This pannus would have its own contractile characteristics and friction between this surface and the outer capsule caused continuous communication of tissue in fine fragments that scattered throughout the intracapsular space. The surgical removal of coarsely texture surface implants also presented problems. Many users developed thick, complex multilayered capsules bound to the prosthesis surface through interdigitation. Removal becomes difficult after 24-36 months, in particular if there are residual capsule fragments from earlier prostheses.

The only novel technology that appeared in the late-1980s was that of Dow Corning with microtextured implant surfaces consisting of microscopic columnar elements created through direct molding processes. Molds made by laser micromachining the surface to create fine, deep, closely spaced cavities were employed. These devices were costly to make. Because the molded microtextured element was very small and many were needed, the process for mold making was laborious and erratic. It required the creation of very small holes to produce a plastic surface with fine columns of polymer with average diameters below 0.05 mm. This is not feasible with precision machine tools. It requires lasers. The lasers produce burnt polymer surfaces that released crumbly, degradable mold debris. The fine holes had a tendency to occlude debris. After several cycles of use, cleaning could not be performed exhaustively, and the holes collected adventitious impurities and viable microorganisms. The service life of the molds was short and reconditioning was costly.

In the final analysis, the ability of these systems to reduce contracture is illusory. Texture is not a major benefit. Worse, it often facilitated contamination. Classical and sub-clinical infections are common and often lead to rapid contracture. Texturing further reduces the already poor rate of long-term success of breast implant surgery. At its worst, it is an additional risk factor because of the ability of porous surfaces to harbor and protect microorganisms.


COMMENTS:


Upon reading Dr. Blais' text above, we painfully learn that textured breast implants are more problematic than the smooth shell. This is why so many women say after implantation that it is too painful to reach up or out with their arms, especially if the implant is under the muscle. The tissue ingrowth can be so severe that it causes muscle shredding. The saline fluid inside the breast has a shelf life, and no hospital will wash a scratch with outdated saline. It becomes septic in less than two years time. The closed cells and the poor permeability of the surfaces would facilitate growth of bacteria and aberrant denaturation of tissue within enclosed spaces. When infection occurred at the prosthesis-tissue, the problem was uncontrollable and self-propagating. These facts explain why there is itching, burning, and inflammation even after explant.

Some infection from breast implants are similar to a gunshot wound in battle, there is no cure for the induced infection. Dr. Blais says repeatedly that breast implantation is a greater wound than many gunshot wounds in battle. Dr. Blais explains why the textured implants are almost impossible to completely explant leaving debris behind that no medication will help.

The sad truth is, what is on the breast implant insert information packet from the manufacturer is almost completely opposite to what takes place in the woman 's body. Dr. Blais has about 200 pairs of textured breast implants that he has tested. He carefully records all of the information of the implant, even to the packet insert that has in his words wonderful wool-spin messages on them.
Enquiries are invited,

Adella Matthew

"There is no agony like bearing an untold story inside of you." ~ Maya Angelou

My Story - Toxic Breast Implants

“Some choices we live not only once but a thousand times over, remembering them for the rest of our lives.” ~Richard Bach
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12-12-2007, 02:28 PM
Post: #2
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Beth,

Just read the comments section regarding infections.
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12-12-2007, 02:44 PM
Post: #3
  Location: NoImplants, Pennsylvania
  Type of Implants: Saline Filled (Smooth)
  Year/Years implanted: 1996
  Have you been Explanted?: Yes
  Implant Placement: Submuscular ('under muscle')
  Are you ill from Implants?: Yes
  What symptoms are you experiencing?: Fibromyalgia Chronic Fatigue Joint Aches Brain Fog Achy joints and muscles Memory problems Depression Vertigo Gastrointestinal problems All over body weakness
  Who removed your implants?: Dr. in Pennsylvania
  Did you Improve after Explant?: Feeling much better but still have a few lingering symptoms
 
[font=comic sans ms]ARE YOU KIDDING ME?????

"There is no agony like bearing an untold story inside of you." ~ Maya Angelou

My Story - Toxic Breast Implants

“Some choices we live not only once but a thousand times over, remembering them for the rest of our lives.” ~Richard Bach
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12-12-2007, 03:26 PM
Post: #4
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Beth,

No fevers, but always the chills.
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12-13-2007, 01:34 PM
Post: #5
  Location: NoImplants, Pennsylvania
  Type of Implants: Saline Filled (Smooth)
  Year/Years implanted: 1996
  Have you been Explanted?: Yes
  Implant Placement: Submuscular ('under muscle')
  Are you ill from Implants?: Yes
  What symptoms are you experiencing?: Fibromyalgia Chronic Fatigue Joint Aches Brain Fog Achy joints and muscles Memory problems Depression Vertigo Gastrointestinal problems All over body weakness
  Who removed your implants?: Dr. in Pennsylvania
  Did you Improve after Explant?: Feeling much better but still have a few lingering symptoms
 
[font=comic sans ms]I ASKED YOU ABOUT THIS BECAUSE I'M WONDERING IF THIS IS WHAT I HAVE.

"There is no agony like bearing an untold story inside of you." ~ Maya Angelou

My Story - Toxic Breast Implants

“Some choices we live not only once but a thousand times over, remembering them for the rest of our lives.” ~Richard Bach
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12-13-2007, 03:10 PM
Post: #6
  Location: 
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Beth,

I made the appt today.
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12-13-2007, 03:12 PM
Post: #7
  Location: 
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Beth,

I believe they treat bone infections with IV drips.
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12-14-2007, 12:30 PM
Post: #8
  Location: NoImplants, Pennsylvania
  Type of Implants: Saline Filled (Smooth)
  Year/Years implanted: 1996
  Have you been Explanted?: Yes
  Implant Placement: Submuscular ('under muscle')
  Are you ill from Implants?: Yes
  What symptoms are you experiencing?: Fibromyalgia Chronic Fatigue Joint Aches Brain Fog Achy joints and muscles Memory problems Depression Vertigo Gastrointestinal problems All over body weakness
  Who removed your implants?: Dr. in Pennsylvania
  Did you Improve after Explant?: Feeling much better but still have a few lingering symptoms
 
HI GINA,

[font=Comic Sans MS]YES, THAT IS A LONG TIME TO WAIT.

"There is no agony like bearing an untold story inside of you." ~ Maya Angelou

My Story - Toxic Breast Implants

“Some choices we live not only once but a thousand times over, remembering them for the rest of our lives.” ~Richard Bach
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12-15-2007, 10:45 AM
Post: #9
  Location: 
  Type of Implants: 
  Year/Years implanted: 
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  Are you ill from Implants?: 
  What symptoms are you experiencing?: 
  Who removed your implants?: 
  Did you Improve after Explant?: 
 
Hello everyone and Merry Christmas!

I don't even know what to tell you. I thought explant was the answer to all my symptoms....I just read the article above regarding that it is almost impossible to remove all the poly or exterior of the implant that meshes with tissue. My explant was July 11th 2007 and I have as much or more pain now than I did in June of this year.

My appointment with the rheumatologist was moved up from March 19th, 2008 to yesterday morning. I took copies of lab work that has been done recently and Dr. Kolb's post op report. This rheumatologist is going to run some of the same tests over again.....the ANA, a CDC, a SSA, a DNA.......and some others.........she thinks I have Fibro..........the burning muscle and nerve pain has increased and continues....some days really bad..........my left shoulder hurts like a tooth ache all the time....like clear down in the bone......I told her I have inflamation all over my upper body....and at times it "flares" ; when it subsides, I am left with lots of aches and stiffnes. If this is Fibro, I am really amazed.........it is so bad, you would think it was something "more serious"......I have been checked for Lupus....negative.......my first ANA test was negative ....so it doesn't even show that I have an auto immune problem.....and yet I live in this body that hurts all the time.....clear down to my waist.......sometimes my lower back hurts so bad, I just take my pills and go to bed.

The rheumatologist gave me a 21 day supply of Lyrica....and I took one last night....can't recommend these pills. They are suppose to be good for nerve pain.....the dose was 50 mg and they make you loopy and dizzy....who knows if they helped cause I soon went to sleep with my Ultracet and Ativan and Benedryl also in my system. I do know that I woke up at 5 am with a terrible, aching, headache that has lingered all day (the literature says that one of the side effects could be a headache)......I have felt hung over all day. I did better just taking the other medicines I mentioned........I don't see how you could take it in the daytime...makes you so loopy and dizzy..........anyway, there is something very wrong with me and these doctors are acting like I am a "head case". My throat is chronically sore with blisters and ulcerated places in the inside on the sides of my mouth....my tongue stings and is sore on the tip and down the sides...............meanwhile, since my white count does not show that I am "sick".....everywhere I go I just get frustrated. The doctor yesterday did a bunch of xrays of my neck, hips and shoulders..........looking for what???? she didn't say......osteo arthritis????

I need to read more about Fibro and what works and what doesn't work. I was told years ago I had Fibro..........but I have never had symptoms like these.

sorry this is so long......it's backed up in me I guess..................God Bless

Frankie
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12-15-2007, 11:22 AM
Post: #10
  Location: NoImplants, Pennsylvania
  Type of Implants: Saline Filled (Smooth)
  Year/Years implanted: 1996
  Have you been Explanted?: Yes
  Implant Placement: Submuscular ('under muscle')
  Are you ill from Implants?: Yes
  What symptoms are you experiencing?: Fibromyalgia Chronic Fatigue Joint Aches Brain Fog Achy joints and muscles Memory problems Depression Vertigo Gastrointestinal problems All over body weakness
  Who removed your implants?: Dr. in Pennsylvania
  Did you Improve after Explant?: Feeling much better but still have a few lingering symptoms
 
HI FRANKIE,

[font=Comic Sans MS]BEEN WONDERING HOW YOU ARE DOING.

"There is no agony like bearing an untold story inside of you." ~ Maya Angelou

My Story - Toxic Breast Implants

“Some choices we live not only once but a thousand times over, remembering them for the rest of our lives.” ~Richard Bach
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